Adding Runbook Actions

Actions are runbook operations that pull, push, and put data leveraging Transposit's library of Integration APIs.

When you create a runbook, add actions for kicking off processes automatically when the runbook starts, at the click of one or more buttons within the body of the runbook and when a runbook succeeds or fails, as shown above.

Follow the steps below to add and organize the actions in your runbooks.

  1. Add Actions
  2. Define Parameters
  3. Add Humans in the Loop

1. Add Actions#

Hover over a plus icon in the start, body, or end of a runbook, and click Run action or Set activity field, which appear as shown below.

Run action lets you choose an action made available by Transposit's library of integration APIs or a custom action you have defined yourself, while Set activity field lets you fill in an activity field with the output of a previously run action in the chain.

When actions relate to each other, you can chain them together, so that they are executed in sequence within a single process.

Below, you see actions that will run sequentially because they are chained in the same section of a runbook, together with activity fields that are set during the process.

Note 1: Output of one action can be used as the input of another action, see Action Parameters for details.

Note 2: Depending on the actions you select, you may need to define applicable connectors to external services, as explained in Adding Your First Integration.

2. Define Parameters#

Type text in action fields and click the Data buttons to define dynamic parameters that will be populated automatically when the action is executed during runbook runs.

For example, you can use a parameter to refer to the output of a previous action, as shown below, where the parameters of a Zoom Action are populated by the output of a Jira Action.

As seen above, bubble visualizations help runbook users to understand the data that will be filled in without needing to know the syntax of the underlying parameters, which are defined using Mustache templates, as shown below.

  • {{Activity.commander}}
  • {{Action.Inputs.transposit_create_linked_jira.summary}}
  • {{Runbook.created_at}}

You do not need to know the Mustache template syntax when you define parameters because they are generated for you when you use the Add Dynamic Parameter dialog, after clicking Data in the related action field, as shown below.

Note: You can type text and provide multiple parameters in an action field, as shown below.

For each type of parameter, the available values that can be selected when you are defining your actions are outlined per type below.

Activity Parameters#

To create a parameter that uses information from the activity that runs the runbook in which the action is defined, select Activity and then choose the relevant activity field, as shown below.

The bubble visualization for activities is blue, as shown below, which appears automatically after you select an activity field in the list above and click Add.

When you hover over the visualization, the underlying template is shown, as can be seen below. In the example below, the description of the activity within which the runbook will run defines the description of the action field.

Action Parameters#

Output of one action can be used as the input of another action.

For example, you may want to implement an incident response process that uses a unique ticket number created in Jira to tie together communication channels, such as via Slack and Zoom, and to escalate issues to engineers and the operations team, all with the context available in the originating ticket.

To create a parameter that uses information from the previous action, select Action, choose the relevant previous action, and select the parameter that will provide the input to the parameter you're defining, as shown below.

The bubble visualization for activities is light green, as shown below, which appears automatically after you select an action parameter in the list above and click Add.

When you hover over the visualization, the underlying template is shown, as can be seen below. In the example below, the topic of a Zoom meeting is defined by the summary, priority, and issue number of the related Jira issue.

Global Parameters#

Global parameters are provided, available to you when you select Global and then choose the relevant parameter, as shown below.

The bubble visualization for activities is purple, as shown below, which appears automatically after you select a global parameter in the list above and click Add.

Runbook Parameters#

To create a parameter that uses information from the runbook that contains the action, select Runbook and then choose the relevant field, as shown below.

The bubble visualization for activities is dark green, as shown below, which appears automatically after you select a global parameter in the list above and click Add.

Trigger Parameters#

To create a parameter that uses information from a webhook that triggers the runbook, select Trigger and then choose the relevant webhook and parameter, as shown below.

The bubble visualization for activities is red, as shown below, which appears automatically after you select a global parameter in the list above and click Add.

Note: For further details, which varies per external service that the webhook works with, see Adding Your First Webhook.

3. Add Humans in the Loop#

Humans can be enabled to intervene in the automation loop in two ways.

  • Provide Buttons. Define buttons for runbook users to click to kick off parts of the automations within the runbook body.
  • Enable User Input. Specify for each action field whether the person who executes the runbook should be enabled to provide input when the runbook is run.

Provide Buttons#

Click + Button in the runbook body and type a label that will appear on the button. Chain actions together for each button. You can add as many buttons as you need and further structure them within sections in the runbook, as shown below.


When the runbook is run, the buttons will be shown so that the user can click them at the appropriate time to initiate the automation that you have made available via the buttons, as shown below.

Enable User Input#

Check the Prompt for user input checkbox for each action field, depending on whether user input will be required when the runbook is run or whether you will define the data now while defining the runbook.

For example, below, in a GitHub-related action, the owner name is hardcoded to "apache", while the repo name is predefined to be "netbeans" with the option for the user running the runbook to override it.

When the runbook is run, each action field that has Prompt for user input enabled is shown to the runbook user in a dialog, enabling the runbook user to intervene and influence the automation process, as shown below.

Next Steps#